Blog

Portland Go!

Marquee at the Hollywood Theatre, Portland
The screen at the Hollywood Theatre, Portland
Currently Reading: 
To Green Angel Tower part 2 (Memory, Sorrow and Thorn book #3) by Tad Williams

The Portland screening of L!F!P! went off really well last night. It was a small audience but a very enthusiastic one. The best, perhaps, was seeing old friends whom I've not seen in many years. Philly ex-pats forever love this city. All received Goldenberg's peanut chews. 

I must say, it was a thrill seeing this marquee when I first saw the theatre. 

Gamera For Amateurs

Brother Bull holds an eastern box turtle at the Schuylkill Environmental Center
Currently Reading: 
Red Moon by Benjamin Percy
To Green Angel Tower part 2 (Memory, Sorrow and Thorn book #3) by Tad Williams
Today's Playlist: 
Kristall & Isa by Paysage D'Hiver
Moyshe McStiff and Tartan Lancers Of The Sacred Heart by C.O.B.
Songs From Wasties Orchard by Magna Carta
Under the Ashes by Framtid
Wasted Again by Michael Chapman

Yesterday my brother Bull and I rambled through the Schuylkill Environmental Center here in my neighborhood of Philadelphia. We were out to pick the wine berries that are out and abundant (and free!) at this time of the year. In the 90-or-so minutes we were out there, we came upon two eastern box turtles, a snake, some stupid bugs, a bullfrog, some other frogs and tadpoles, a toad, and a deer. Here's Bull with one of the turtles, which was eating the very same berries were we picking when we found it (and you can see in its mouth).

A Reminder To Those In the Pacific Northwest...

Flyer for the Portland screening of the live LOUD! FAST! PHILLY! show
Currently Reading: 
Red Moon by Benjamin Percy
To Green Angel Tower part 2 (Memory, Sorrow and Thorn book #3) by Tad Williams
Today's Playlist: 
Conoce Los Caminos by Orthodox
s/t by Morgen
Seasons by Magna Carta
The Time Has Come by Anne Briggs
Under the Ashes by Framtid

...or those who know people who live in or around Portland, Oregon.

I'm doing the live L!F!P! presentation for one night only at the gorgeous Hollywood Theatre in Portland on Wednesday, July 17 at 7:30 PM. For the two Philly shows at the Cinedelphia Film Festival back in April we gave out old audio tapes belonging to my brother Bull and me to attendees. This time I'm bringing something more full-on Philly to give out to folks. I won't say what it is, but I will say that my mother was kind enough to buy me three bags of these jawns and I'm flying them over from Philly. This means DON'T THROW THEM AT ME during the presentation. 

You can be an angel baby freshly hatched from a golden egg by making sure anyone you know who might be interested in coming out knows about it and actually bikes on over. I should be reporting back with photos from the show.

It should be noted that the form of the live presentation has changed somewhat since the two Philly shows (which were also different from each other). This new incarnation features a few video clips of folks talking live at the first Philly show and removes a piece of blab-blab footage of interminable length that I had already cut from Philly show #1 right before we did show #2.. What I'll be showing will now be the longest cut of the presentation, even with the removal. 

Last Utterance

Cover of the First Utterance album by Comus from 1971
Currently Reading: 
Red Moon by Benjamin Percy
To Green Angel Tower part 2 (Memory, Sorrow and Thorn book #3) by Tad Williams
Today's Playlist: 
Conoce Los Caminos by Orthodox
s/t by Morgen
Seasons by Magna Carta
The Time Has Come by Anne Briggs
Under the Ashes by Framtid

"The love and peace thing, it was very weak. It didn't have any teeth, and you wanted to give it a kick."

This is Roger Wootton of the gloriously demented band Comus on their early songs. The quote is drawn from Jeanette Leach's piece "Comus Wakes, He Starts To Play..." that appears in the recent (and recommended) Shindig! Presents Witches Hats & Painted Chariots - The Incredible String Band and the 5,000 Layers of Psychedelic Folk Music (2013).

I can almost take it as a given that by mid-2013 everyone who should have heard Comus' First Utterance (1971) has heard it, but on the off chance you've not fallen under its mischievous and murderous spell, it comes recommended as one of my all-time favorite albums.

Independence Day Means I Love YoU(SA)!

Currently Reading: 
Red Moon by Benjamin Percy
To Green Angel Tower part 1 (Memory, Sorrow and Thorn book #3) by Tad Williams
Today's Playlist: 
Conoce Los Caminos by Orthodox
Jook Rule by Jook
Nothing Can Hurt Me by Big Star

July 4th is as good a day as any (better, in fact) to reiterate a salient point that I've mentioned elsewhere but you may not realize: the lightning bolts in the L!F!P! logo image designed by Justin Miller are coming out of the Liberty Bell, not into it. This means, in effect, that the symbol of American freedom is not being destroyed by outside forces, be they the punk this project focuses on or anything else. Rather, great bolts of luminous power are bursting forth from the Liberty Bell here in Philadelphia and out into the world. Putting aside any criticisms of this country by some of the interview subjects and sometimes me, I love and embrace the United States. For me, this project is a celebration of uniquely American voices and these voices, like the country that nurtured them, is a thing of beauty.

Goodbye, Chloe, Goodbye

Chloe the Cat, Forever I Love Her

Today I mourn the death of my #1 cat, Chloe (seen here a few years ago). Chloe was actually the second cat that my friend Kathie and I adopted, but the first I truly loved. Kathie found her among some homes being refurbished by Habitat For Humanity in West Philly in over 17 years ago. Chloe lived with me from a tiny studio apartment in Rittenhouse Square, to a house in East Falls, and finally in my current home in Roxborough. Some years ago she moved to Oregon with Kathie and her boyfriend Jason and came to live in Portland. After a long bout of ill-health and dramatic weight-loss, she was euthanized with Kathie and Jason beside her in their home last night. I was to see Chloe in two weeks when I go to Portland for my annual visit. It'll be sad going there and not seeing her affectionate and intelligent little self, but she spent a long life being adored. Chloe holds permanent residence in my heart.

Two For Two!

Currently Reading: 
Red Moon by Benjamin Percy
To Green Angel Tower part 1 (Memory, Sorrow and Thorn book #3) by Tad Williams
Today's Playlist: 
One Tree or Another by Keef James
Small Boats by Steve Atkinson

Today was an  excellent day for L!F!P! interviews. It was a great pleasure for me to sit down with two enthusiastic guys, Billy Barton ex-USMC and in the bands Population Zero and The Charlie Few, and Mike McManus of Pagan Babies and The Heels. Interviews like these inspire me to keep talking to people because the end result is inspiring and the process of getting there is so enjoyable for me. These are voices that matter.

Schulwerk

Schulwerk (Music For Children) by Carl Orff & Gunild Keetman (1958)
Currently Reading: 
Red Moon by Benjamin Percy
To Green Angel Tower part 1 (Memory, Sorrow and Thorn book #3) by Tad Williams
Today's Playlist: 
Schulwerk (Music For Children) by Carl Orff & Gunild Keetman

The great composer Carl Orff is mostly known today for his thundering "Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi" from Carmena Burana (1935/6). This piece of music is used in films as shorthand for "epic" (see: Conan and countless other movies). My love of Orff's work began in earnest when I heard it used in the the 1973 Terrence Malick classic film Badlands. Malick used Orff's gentle and playful compositions that you can hear on Schulwerk (Music For Children, 1958) to marvelous effect throughout the movie. Trunk Records (UK), known for years as purveyors of the fine and weird in music, have just issued a deluxe CD -- running a glorious 85 (!)) tracks -- of Orff's work with Keetman and choirs. I've been obsessively collecting Orff LPs and CDs for years, and this is collection of merry and joyous music is one of the coruscating jewels of his ouevre. In the US you can score a copy (while it remains in print) from Forced Exposure.

Comets On Liar

William Styron's 1967 novel The Confessions of Nat Turner
Currently Reading: 
Red Moon by Benjamin Percy
To Green Angel Tower part 1 (Memory, Sorrow and Thorn book #3) by Tad Williams
Today's Playlist: 
Corollaries by Lubomyr Melnyk
My Life Sucks and I Could Care Less by Culo
Revelation Space by Kawabata Makoto's Mainliner
s/t by School Jerks
Walk Right Back: The Everly Brothers on Warner Bros., 1960-1969 by The Everly Brothers

I've been interested in reading William Styron's The Confessions of Nat Turner (1967) since I saw it prominently appear in the beach ball-popping and whitey-hacking humdinger of an ending to Jacopetti and Prosperi's Farewell Uncle Tom (Addio Zio Tom, 1971). The book both won the Pulitzer Prize for literature and garnered accusations of racism. I picked up a copy of it at the Book Corner (the Friends of the Philadelphia Free Library used book store) yesterday largely because the cover called out to me. I mean, look at that little flying dude to the left of the very stoic head presumably belonging to Nat Turner. It looks as if he's about to be pegged by a comet that's flown through Turner's voluminous afro. I don't know what I'll think of the book when I get the opportunity to actually read it, but this looks to be the edition to own.

Pages